Mindfulness for Writers

One way or another, 2016 was a pretty stressful year for me. And for many, I guess.  Often I compared the world to a spinning top and wished that, just for ten minutes, I could get off. And I think I might have landed upon a way to do just that. Mindfulness. A form of meditation that encourages you to concentrate just on the present; to not worry about the future or dwell upon the past.

How often have you walked down street and suddenly reached your destination, without having observed the route – because your  mind is full of everyday concerns? Mindfulness helps push those worry-some thoughts to one side, for a while, by encouraging you to really focus on your surroundings. Either the noises – traffic, aeroplanes, birds, pedestrians chatting… or the sights, such as the detailed shape and colour of buildings. This enables us to get off the spinning top for a few minutes and relax!

mindfulness crystals

Yesterday I went on a mindfulness walk – I’m doing a course and this was a planned excursion. We studied the textures and colours of the woodland and river. We listened hard to the birds and ended with a super meditation. Below is a photo I took of a log’s perfect reflection.

mindfulness log 2

Here is a tree’s trunk, with contrasting colours and peeling bark. Mindfulness is about observing and appreciating the detail.

mindfulnes bark

So, how can this help my job as an author? Well, mindfulness requires you to connect with all your five senses on an intimate level – and the five senses are so important, in writing, for conveying settings, feelings – EVERYTHING –  to the reader. As a novelist, I do my best to write in the most sensory way possible, but mindfulness is training me how to really become aware of  the detail. That way the story becomes fuller and more relatable and realistic for the reader.

Eating a biscuit? Okay. Let’s be mindful about the five senses! Say with a fruit and oat cookie.

Sight – its surface is rough, with oat ridges and soft spots filled with succulent raisins and perhaps apple. The biscuit is baked to a warm, inviting brown colour. The round shape is not a perfect circle and it is too big to eat in one go. It is solid. Chunky. Thick. Looks filling and unbreakable.

Smell – a subtle sweetness, increased by the fruit but subdued by the oats. A similar aroma to apple crumble. It reminds you of baking sessions with your mother. A cosy kitchen with sweet treats in the oven. Buttery and comforting.

Hearing – as you bite in, there is a snapping noise as a bit breaks off. Then munching  sounds as you chew and break it into smaller parts. The whole process quietens down as saliva mixes with the biscuit and makes it almost liquid as it travels silently down your throat.

Touch – initially as solid as concrete when your teeth touch the outside. But after a little pressure, your teeth sink in and break off a part. Then that chunk moves to the side of your mouth and  becomes chewy as your molars go up and down on the raisin and apple bits. Eventually it crumbles across your tongue, spreading nicely to hit all those tastebuds. The whole experience is satisfying and makes you feel full. There is a sense of safety, well-being and happiness. You recall more memories of childhood baking and time spent with Mum or coffee and cake excursions with friends or a loved one.

Taste – solid oaty flavours dominate until you chew and then burst of sweetness dance on your tongue as the apple bits and raisins break apart. Apple crumble. Flapjack. Breakfast cereal. A satisfying taste that isn’t rich and sickly, and leaves you wanting more.

So, forgive me, if my novels become a little longer! A cup of tea and slice of cake could become a whole new adventure! But seriously, why not consider taking some time out to connect with the fundamentals? It will give you a whole new set of tools to deal with the complexities of modern life.

 

 

 

 

6 comments

  1. Caroline Bell Foster says:

    Lovely post Sam, I’ve always lived by the simple rule of not just smelling the roses, but taking the time to enjoy the journey along the way and I make sure my characters do the same 🙂

    Let’s have some cake! x

    • Sam Tonge says:

      Thanks Caroline and love your attitude. I have to remind myself, sometimes, it really isn’t all about the destination… 🙂 x

  2. Jan Brigden says:

    Great post, Sam. I’m a huge fan of mindfulness and its overall effect on our wellbeing. My best friend introduced me to meditation a while back and whether I sit for 5 mins or 25 mins, I feel the benefit. I loved reading about your mindfulness walk; it’s such a pleasure to take pleasure in the simple things we take so much for granted, isn’t it? So true how mindfulness can also help with writing and connecting with the senses. Fab pics too! 🙂 Xx

    • Sam Tonge says:

      Thanks Jan. It would seem I am a little late to the mindfulness party! I think we all have preconceptions about what “Meditation” is and I have to say, I’ve been really pleasantly surprised. Just nice to take some “time out”, isn’t it? xx

      • Janet Brigden says:

        Absolutely agree, Sam. I was quite iffy about it all before I tried it and as you say, it works in different ways for different people. Or not, as the case may be. Glad you are enjoying the experience so far. 🙂 Xx

        • Sam Tonge says:

          Yes, I think once you accept intrusive thoughts will happen, and you just have to butt them out, then it’s all good! xx

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